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Porco Rosso - Mexico City

Coyoacán, Cuauhtémoc, El Rosedal, Granada - Nuevo Polanco, La Condesa, Mexico City, Polanco, Roma Norte

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Overall Rating

  • Ambience 80%
  • Service 75%
  • Food (Execution) 85%
  • Creativity 90%
  • Value 90%

Details for Location Reviewed
Porco Rosso - Mexico City

Locale: Coyoacán, Cuauhtémoc, El Rosedal, Granada - Nuevo Polanco, La Condesa, Mexico City, Polanco, Roma Norte Address: Río Nazas 111

Telephone: +52 55 9155 7672

Restaurant Type: Casual Dining
Cuisine: American Barbecue, American Cuisine Service Type: Table Service, Take-out Price: $$$$ Menu items offered: Coffee, Desserts

Hours: Mon-Sat: 1pm to 10pm Sun: 1pm to 8pm

This restaurant has multiple locations. Please refer to the map for information about each location including hours of operation.

Details for Location Reviewed
Porco Rosso - Mexico City

Locale: Coyoacán, Cuauhtémoc, El Rosedal, Granada - Nuevo Polanco, La Condesa, Mexico City, Polanco, Roma Norte
Address: Río Nazas 111
Telephone: +52 55 9155 7672

Restaurant Type: Casual Dining
Cuisine: American Barbecue, American Cuisine
Service Type: Table Service, Take-out

Price: $$$$
Restaurant Features:

Hours: Mon-Sat: 1pm to 10pm
Sun: 1pm to 8pm

This restaurant has multiple locations. Please refer to the map for information about each location including hours of operation.

Summary of Review

Porco Rosso is one of handful of new restaurants in DF offering US-style barbecue (smoked meats) in a comfortable, casual atmosphere. Great food.

Summary of Review

Porco Rosso is one of handful of new restaurants in DF offering US-style barbecue (smoked meats) in a comfortable, casual atmosphere. Great food.

Restaurant Review for Porco Rosso - Mexico City

 

Review by: Ollie O
Rating: 4.2 stars
Review Date: 09/25/2017

Porco Rosso is one of a handful of restaurants that has recently opened in Mexico City that offers Texas-style barbecue. Of course, if you’re from Missouri you’d likely call it Kansas City-style barbecue. From Tennessee? Then of course it’s Memphis-style barbecue. Doesn’t really matter what you call it. All that matters is that it’s one of the tastiest forms of cooked meat on the face of the earth, and possible in the entire universe.

In fact, Porco Rosso touts it’s offering of smoked meats as being Kansas City BBQ. In reality, there is little if any difference in regional styles. They all focus on one thing. Smoking cheap cuts of meat at a ridiculously low temperature with hot smoke for a ridiculously long period of time (typically between 10 and 15 hours). In each region, a dry spice rub is used, then the meat, typically pork shoulder or ribs, or beef brisket and ribs, is cooked using only the hot smoke from an adjoining fire-box at a very low temperature for up to 15 hours.

I’ve been to Porco Rosso several times, in several of their locations. The ambience is similar in all locations. The walls are all covered in galvanized steel. Lots of picnic tables. And a young, energetic staff of waiters and waitresses. Big rolls of paper to wipe your fingers on as it is mandatory to get your fingers dirty when you eat this type of barbecue. It’s actually a state law in Texas.

The method of preparing U.S. style barbeque falls roughly into two groups. Those that do it the old-fashioned way with a wood-burning smoker, usually utilizing a fruitwood like apple or cherry or in Texas, sometimes using Mesquite wood which provides a slightly more potent, smoky taste.

Only one of the restaurants in DF offering this type of barbecued meat uses this wood-burning method. That would be Pinche Gringo, which also has multiple locations in Mexico City, with a very similar ambience to that at Porco Rosso.

The others all use industrial-style smokers that typically utilize slow-burning wood pellets to create smoke in a large industrial oven designed to circulate this smoke.

Which method is better is subject to some dispute and more likely depends on personal preference than on any technical difference in the outcome of the product.

I convinced the employees to sell me a mix of their smoked meats (which is not a typical menu offering) so I was able to sample everything they offer: smoked chicken breast, smoke sausage, brisket, smoked beef ribs, and baby-back ribs. Everything was delicious. Perhaps one or two of the cuts were slightly overcooked. But barely worth mentioning. I had cole slaw and macaroni and cheese for my sides. Both very good.

On another visit, I tried the brisket sandwich. Very good. And they are all accompanied by a delicious barbecue sauce.

Now these barbecue joints, including Porco Rosso, aren’t cheap. They’re definitely priced a bit higher than your typical casual dining restaurant or burger joint. But not significantly so. For a big sandwich piled high with tasty smoked brisket you’ll pay around $115 pesos (about U.S. $7). Add a side dish of cole slaw, potato salad, or mac and cheese, and you’ll likely be out about 200 pesos ($11 US) for the meal. A bit more than most burger joints but certainly less than many trendy casual dining spots. And what you get is unique and delicious. If you like meat. You will not be disappointed.

I’m not exactly objective as I’m from Texas and was eating this stuff as soon as I was weaned. But I think the flavor in this meat exceeds any Mexican barbacoa or carnitas I’ve tasted in Mexico City. And I’ve had some good versions of that stuff.

If you’re a resident of Mexico City you really need to give one of these barbecue restaurants a try. And if Porco Rosso is close to you, it’s a good one to go to.

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