Select Page

Fork Off

Hipódromo, Mexico City

%

Overall Rating

  • Ambience 70%
  • Service 80%
  • Food (Execution) 80%
  • Creativity 90%
  • Value 70%

Details for Location Reviewed
Fork Off

Locale: Hipódromo, Mexico City
Address: Calle de Aguascalientes 200

Telephone: +52 55 5264 5125
Restaurant Type: Casual Dining
Cuisine: American Barbecue
Service Type: Table Service
Price: $$$$ Menu items offered: Coffee, Desserts, Espresso, Grilled Steaks, Pasta, Salads, Seafood
Hours: Mon-Sat: 1:30pm to 11:30pm Sun: Closed

Restaurant Details
Fork Off

Locale: Hipódromo, Mexico City
Address: Calle de Aguascalientes 200

Telephone: +52 55 5264 5125
Restaurant Type: Casual Dining
Cuisine: American Barbecue
Service Type: Table Service
Price: $$$$ Menu items offered: Coffee, Desserts, Espresso, Grilled Steaks, Pasta, Salads, Seafood
Hours: Mon-Sat: 1:30pm to 11:30pm Sun: Closed

Summary of Review

If you’ve never tasted Texas barbecue, you’ll think you’re in heaven. The smoky taste of those ribs will get you salivating. But if your Texan, you might be a bit disappointed.

Summary of Review

If you’ve never tasted Texas barbecue, you’ll think you’re in heaven. The smoky taste of those ribs will get you salivating. But if your Texan, you might be a bit disappointed.

Restaurant Review for Fork Off

 

Review by: Ollie O
Rating: 3.9 stars
Review Date: 01/09/2016

Fork Off is another one of a slew of restaurants looking to capitalize on the much-deserved popularity of Texas-style barbecue. We note that residents of St. Louis, Missouri and Memphis, Tennesee also lay claim to having the best barbecue, but Fork Off seems to have bought into every Texan’s claim that barbecue is a “Texas-thing” as the décor is decidedly Texan from the Lone Star beer plaques to the longhorn steer skulls decorating the walls.

The restaurant is one huge room (what appears to have previously been a large parking garage) covered overhead by an arched corrugated steel roof. The room is lined with “picnic tables”. Hanging plants overhead add a natural touch to what would otherwise would have the feel and personality of a car mechanic’s shop (which of course is the personality most restaurants in Texas possess).

The question remains, “Has Fork Off replicated the unique Texan cuisine?”

Sort of. “Real” Texas barbecue is done in a smoker or pit that provides indirect heat via smoke generated in an accompanying “fire box” with a fire stoked with mesquite or apple wood. Fork off has taken the “easy way out”, using an industrial indoor smoker that likely creates smoke via the slow incineration of wood pellets. Now that doesn’t sound Texan, does it?

But the proof is in the pudding (or the pecan pie, as the case might be). How did the meat from that industrial smoker taste? Well on the first visit I had the brisket sandwich, topped with a big glob of cole slaw. The meat piled on that bun was juicy and fork tender. Cooked just right. It had a faint smoky taste. Not as much as I’m accustomed to but enough to give the sandwich a bit of personality.

On the second visit, I tried a small portion of the baby back ribs, accompanied by some mac n’ cheese. A few comments regarding authenticity are in order. As you can see they cut the meat across the rib. They don’t do that way in Texas. They don’t even do that in Memphis or St. Louis. The only place I know of that they cut a rib like that is in Asia. Hmmm? There was definitely a strong smoky taste in those ribs and the dry-rub was really good. But there was no bark on those ribs. Something I noticed was missing on the brisket in the sandwich too. That industrial smoker doesn’t produce the somewhat crispy exterior that true wood-fired smokers produce.

Another thing I noticed. They served hot rolls on the side. They were spongy soft and fresh, the way a good roll should be. But where was the creamy butter? And don’t they typically eat Texas Toast or a big slice of Texas white bread in barbecue joints in Texas? Well . . . yes that’s true. But it’s not unheard of to see rolls, cornbread or even drop biscuits served with BBQ in Texas. So, we’re letting that minor transgression slide.

Final verdict. If you’ve never tasted Texas barbecue, you’ll think you’re in heaven. The smoky taste of those ribs will get you salivating. But if your Texan, you might be a bit disappointed.

We note that Porco Rosso, an upstart restaurant chain in DF that claims to serve up St. Louis style barbecue uses and industrial smoker. The finished product suffers a bit as a result.

But “hats off” to all these innovative restaurateurs that are bringing the iconic cuisine of Texas down across the border to its southern neighbor.

One final note. That big room, despite having fans blaring full blast, gets a little warm when the temperature rises above 85 F (30 C). So, if you’re not into to heat, you might want try Starbucks for a brownie and coffee instead. If you’re Texan it won’t likely be an issue . . . you’re used to the heat.

Another thing. This smoked-meat is a little pricey at Fork Off. Not outrageously so. But if you have a big appetite (like at Texan) stop by the ATM on the way.

Latin America Brewpub Guide